Arguing against a result doesn’t mean the end of democracy!

I completely agree with the words of Ian Hislop on BBC Question Time (7th July 2016) “Even if you lose the vote you are entitled to go on making the argument”.

I have seen many comments shared over social media from those who voted to ‘Leave’ about ‘Remainers’ having tantrums, whining and should move on. As a part of our democracy when a election is won no one has to shut up and accept what is going on for 5 years. There would be no need for an opposition party, and of course we would be living in an authoritarian state if so.

I accept that others have a different view, but I personally feel this referendum shouldn’t have happened, and the leave result will be an absolute disaster for many reasons. This isn’t something that can be overturned in 5 years, and allowing the UK to leave the European Union will be something that we can’t go back from as things turn out for the worse in the years ahead.

For those who use statements of “you are Britain hating” etc; it is not patriotic to launch Britain into ‘Brexit’ without a plan on what happens next. The leaders who fought for this campaign or gave us the choice; either resigned or backed away, leaving others to clean up the mess in my view. “Brexit means Brexit” is a lazy statement that doesn’t explain anything. Over two million British citizens living abroad felt disenfranchised with the result, with many not having a say. The legal arguments also state that Parliament should have the final say so lobbying your MP to make a difference, and tactical voting in the near future is the way forward.

I firmly believe that going down the ‘Brexit’ route is wrong on so many levels, and the result was very close anyway. Now is the time to come together and heal the divisions within the country, and with our neighbours before it is too late!

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2 comments

  1. Luke Wheeler · August 11, 2016

    Feelings aside, the opportunity for EU membership supporters is to help shape what Brexit looks like. The vote to leave was a vote to leave – nothing more nothing less – so leaving could mean having very close ties to other EU members (and the EU institutions) or distant ties. With pro-Remain May at the helm combined with cautious (economic) pragmatism the most likely base in the short-medium terms is continued EEA membership. This is something that keeps many of the doors to the EU open and simultaneously opens up some of the opportunities that arise from non-EU membership (e.g. Trade). The Pro-EU lobby need to leave behind the 48% badge which accentuates it’s minority status, and occupy the popular middle ground which would involve cooperating and collaborating with EU countries on matters of shared interest, albeit from a non-membership position.

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    • J Wils · August 11, 2016

      We need to stay in the EU. The EEA does not want us apparently as we are too large a country in comparison to the other members. We need a clear statement though to stop the racism being directed at people. But we are losing companies already who are moving their bases to Europe. What is to happen. I do not want to be part of a UK on its own. Perhaps there is some hope that the EU and European Commission could decide to modify the elements of it that people object to – not just here but elsewhere in Europe. But for me – I am an EU citizen – I had hoped to move to live in Europe – many friends have husbands who work in Europe (through necessity to get a job) … they only live there while working and some commute at weekends or every few months. And people i know have kids who work in Europe – they have managed to get jobs there as engineers etc. They had assumed they were EU citizens when they got these jobs – what on earth is to happen. The whole situation is poor. If UK cant Remain in Europe I hope that Scotland can and many of us who voted to remain in the UK most certainly would not have voted in such a way if we had known the UK would leave the EU.

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