10 reasons I’m still fighting ‘Brexit’ a month on!

  1. The Lisbon Article 50 is a brutal process where nothing can be done for 2 years, and then several years after spent negotiating trade deals etc, which in my view would be a disaster for the economy which has already started to shrink before Leaving has begun.
  2. The legality of the referendum has been brought up by lawyers as it was meant to be advisory and MP’s have the final say in a vote. Also £5 Billion has been quoted as the figure for lawyers fees to sort out our laws etc in the decade ahead.
  3. The lies used by Leave campaigners especially the £350 million extra a week for the NHS, what else were they hiding behind?
  4. The uncertainty surrounding science research funding and attracting scientists and students to the UK since the result, with the UK’s world-leading position in these areas now being in jeopardy.
  5. The large projects EU funding has given us in Wales and Cornwall for example, with future funding not guaranteed by our governments.
  6. The EU is about peace and moving Europe on from a history of conflict, especially in the 20th century.
  7. The chance that Scotland, and possibly Northern Ireland could break away from the UK and remain in the EU, and border controls becoming an issue.
  8. The division the campaigning created with hostility, we now need to unite as a country and with our neighbours to sort out this mess!
  9. Theresa May has said “Brexit means Brexit!” but no one has made it clear what that will actually be in how we negotiate our place with the EU and the world.
  10. The freedom to travel freely across Europe we could loose which would affect University’s here and abroad as well as the price of holidays.
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A second month of doom & gloom or a positive outlook ahead?

Looking back to the 24th June I remember vividly the shock, sadness and disappointment of waking up to the ‘Leave’ result. I stick by my opinions that this vote and leaving the EU will be disastrous route to take for the UK in economic terms, for the union with Scotland & Northern Ireland, for science research funding, trade deals, and the protection of the environment & wildlife among many other aspects. I know many of the 48.1% who voted Remain feel similarly, and from reading views of experts the whole article 50 and leaving scenario would be costly both in time and money, as no proper plan was made should this have been the result.

I have become a member of some positive thinking groups on Facebook with over and continue to read posts by ‘Britain Stronger in Europe’ . I believe leaving isn’t inevitable as points have been brought up by lawyers over the legality and not being clear on what ‘Brexit’ actually means among others. There were also the lies told, with Professor Michael Dougan, the leading EU lawyer of the University of Liverpool criticising the “industrial dishonesty” of the leave campaign in a recent video.

A big worry as mentioned previously is the uncertainty surrounding science research funding and attracting scientists and students to the UK since the result. A joint letter from seven academies says that the UK’s world-leading position in these areas is now in jeopardy. They call for the government to make a “bold public commitment” to prioritise reseach in future negotiations, and call for “urgent discussions” on how the government will address any funding gaps in the near future. Their joint letter can be read here:

http://www.acmedsci.ac.uk/…/joint-academies-publish-statem…/

The rhetoric of “Take Back Control” I believe is impossible and would lead to a tough and drawn out struggle to sort out the mess created from officially leaving the EU. The top members of the leave campaign it has been said could be just thinking of themselves and careers, and blame each other, and deny responsibility for the outcome. I have even seen a pro-leave tabloid exclaiming that a Norway style option of being in the single market with free movement is preferred. This is exactly like we had apart from having any say in Brussels.  I remain positive that getting together and fighting, while thinking of the long term in creating a world we all can be proud of being a part of.

A second month of doom & gloom or a positive outlook?

Looking back to the 24th June I remember vividly the shock, sadness and disappointment of waking up to the ‘Leave’ result. I stick by my opinions that this vote and leaving the EU will be disastrous route to take for the UK in economic terms, for the union with Scotland & Northern Ireland, for science research funding, trade deals, and the protection of the environment & wildlife among many other aspects. I know many of the 48.1% who voted Remain feel similarly, and from reading views of experts the whole article 50 and leaving scenario would be costly both in time and money, as no proper plan was made should this have been the result.

I have become a member of a positive thinking group on Facebook; Vote for Europe (Tactical Voting To Stay in the EU): https://www.facebook.com/groups/267345493644579/  with am aim of stopping ‘Brexit’ and rebuilding the country. David Welsh; who created the group has already had a vote over a logo, started up a website, and looking at media coverage. I would recommend joining this group if feel the need to stand up and protest the way the UK is heading, as in a democracy we all have that right. I believe leaving isn’t inevitable as points have been brought up by lawyers over the legality and not being clear on what ‘Brexit’ actually means among others. There were also the lies told, with Professor Michael Dougan, the leading EU lawyer of the University of Liverpool criticising the “industrial dishonesty” of the leave campaign in a recent video.

A big worry as mentioned previously is the uncertainty surrounding science research funding and attracting scientists and students to the UK since the result. A joint letter from seven academies says that the UK’s world-leading position in these areas is now in jeopardy. They call for the government to make a “bold public commitment” to prioritise reseach in future negotiations, and call for “urgent discussions” on how the government will address any funding gaps in the near future. Their joint letter can be read here: http://www.acmedsci.ac.uk/…/joint-academies-publish-statem…/

The rhetoric of “Take Back Control” I believe is impossible and would lead to a tough and drawn out struggle to sort out the mess created from officially leaving the EU. The top members of the leave campaign it has been said could be just thinking of themselves and careers, and blame each other, and deny responsibility for the outcome. I have even seen a pro-leave tabloid exclaiming that a Norway style option of being in the single market with free movement is preferred. This is exactly like we had apart from having any say in Brussels.  I remain positive that getting together and fighting, while thinking of the long term in creating a world we all can be proud of being a part of.

Does Brussels control the weather?

I wasn’t being serious there, just observing that it has seemed to have rained on most days since the referendum on the 23rd June. I know makes me sound gloomy to some, but personally i feel so far nothing positive has come from the ‘leave’ result.

A worrying aspect since the announcement of the 51.9% slight majority for leave has been the division shown up across the country, with hate crimes and insults shown to be massively on the rise. Even families have had split views on which way they voted. These divisions need to be healed somehow if we are to move forward in a positive direction, although I feel both major parties are in turmoil with the conservative party holding it’s leadership contest, and Labour not united on their own leader.

Two of  the main players of the leave campaign; Boris Johnson and Nigel Farage, also have taken a step back after winning the vote, and have been criticised by many for not having a plan for what comes next. I have seen them also described them as “rats leaving a sinking ship”, as do they know that we are in big trouble now? and can’t cope with the responsibility moving forward. Theresa May, one of the conservative leadership contenders has also worryingly not been clear on the future of EU nationals living in the UK, with people’s lives not something you should be bargaining with in future negotiations in my opinion.

Professor Michael Dougan, the leading EU lawyer whose criticism of the referendum campaign’s “industrial dishonesty” went viral, has assessed the UK’s position following the vote to leave the EU in a new video from last week.

He says that this is now a “political crisis that needs a political solution” and that the Government has a “constitutional responsibility to protect the national interest”, with Parliament the ultimate decision-maker on whether the UK follows through and leaves the European Union. I have put his video from last Friday here:

There has been talk of the legality of the result, with it being non-binding and advisory, although that could undermine democracy, as a vote was given. A law firm; Mishcon de Reya is also taking action to ensure the formal process for the UK leaving the EU is not started without an act of Parliament.

I also worry about the future of scientific research in the UK in regards to funding, as a major contributor to the UK economy, but it stands to be the greatest loser from this result. The Astronaut Tim Peake who recently returned from the International Space Station was quoted in the guardian saying:

“We have to make sure we don’t harm ourselves in areas where the EU was particularly good for us. I don’t want to see scientists being punished, and this having negative effects on our science. These are important areas for us to focus on now.”

Any negotiations ahead should protect UK science research as there are signs that UK organisations are already missing out on EU science collaborations because their future involvement cannot be guaranteed.

As I said in my last post if things turn out well in a couple of months or years I will hold my hands up and say I was wrong, but currently I can’t see a positive way forward from leaving the EU. The divisions that have been shown up also need to healed with strong political leadership, which is definitely lacking right now. So much for the rhetoric ‘Take Back Control’, which to me seems a long way away.